Rohr Teaches Hard Work, Dedication

Orchestra Teacher Deserves Rohr-ing Applause

Orchestra+Teacher+Nicola+Rohr
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Rohr Teaches Hard Work, Dedication

Orchestra Teacher Nicola Rohr

Orchestra Teacher Nicola Rohr

Orchestra Teacher Nicola Rohr

Orchestra Teacher Nicola Rohr

Caitlain Stewart, Associate Viewpoints Editor

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Nicola Rohr gracefully steps on stage, greets her audience, then turns to her orchestra and gets in position.

She gently lifts her hands and with one flick of the wrist she is in control.

They are off…flowing and exploding with sounds of grace and perfection. She is in sync with the orchestra as she drops her baton and bows follow.

As Clark County’s only orchestra teacher, Ms. Rohr travels to the different schools to teach. Every year the strings are required to play at Kentucky Music Educators Association, which is an opportunity for schools across the state to perform in front of judges.

Since Ms. Rohr has been at GRC and gone to state assessment, the orchestra has earned two distinguished ratings.

Obviously, her program- building techniques are working.

“Ms. Rohr is a really great teacher,” said senior Lela Hernandez. “She always takes the time to get our opinion on the songs we do.”

Ms. Rohr brings her own musical experience to the classroom. She has played piano since the age of 6 and cello since she was 18.

Her teaching career began in 2010 at the University of Kentucky when she began working for the UK string project, a Saturday morning program for string students of all ages. “I really fell in love with teaching orchestra,” she says.

Ms. Rohr goes above and beyond to show her students how to be the best they can be.

“She has taught me to be better in tune and to be devoted to my music,” said Senior Jacob Little. “I’ve been playing since 6th grade and Ms. Rohr has done a good job of changing the program. She encourages her students to be on time and constantly participate in order to improve their skills.”

Even though Ms. Rohr has only taught for four years, she has shown that when her students graduate from GRC she will have taught them many skills such as how to listen closely and fix their mistakes, or how to use music in their daily lives.

“I hope my students learn to be dedicated and hard-working in orchestra,” she says. “It takes a lot of work to become a good player, and although most of my students will not pursue music as a career, the lessons they can learn in becoming a good musician will help them in whatever career path they choose.”